The Reviews for THE PROM are In…

The Prom

The reviews for The Prom are in, and the critics are in love with this new musical – original musical, we might add – directed and choreographed by Casey Nicholaw. The creative team of Bob Martin (book), Chad Beguelin (book, lyrics), and Matthew Sklar (music) has crafted a fun new musical that manages to poke blues and reds equally enough to call the politics of the piece a wash – and leave the focus on the stellar performances and the heartwarming story at its center. The critics heap the biggest praise on the hilarious Beth Leavel as Dee Dee, the diva with the plan to rejuvenate her fading career in the theatre, but the cast is uniformly excellent, taking full advantage of the musical’s winning comedy and songs. And there may be a little bit of ham and cheese mixed in, but sometimes that’s good for ya. Go ahead – check it out!

NEW YORK TIMES REVIEW OF THE PROM

The Prom begins when a theater critic for The New York Times writes a pan so poisonous that the show he’s reviewing dies on the spot. That’s ridiculous. It could never happen. At any rate, it won’t happen now, because The Prom, which opened on Thursday at the Longacre Theater, is such a joyful hoot…”

DEADLINE REVIEW OF THE PROM

“Your prom probably didn’t have a glorious gaggle of Broadway troupers and their trunk loads of self-regard and narcissism gumming things up for your rite of passage – more’s the pity – but in some ways I’d guess Broadway’s musical The Prom isn’t so unlike the one you lived through way back when. The build-up was more fun than…”

VARIETY REVIEW OF THE PROM

“It seems like a dubious musical mash-up: Broadway narcissists-turned-activists take over a middle-American town to help a lesbian teen who just wants to bring her date to the prom. But with a tuneful score, a playful book, and performances that remind you what Broadway heart and chutzpah are all about…”

HOLLYWOOD REPORTER REVIEW OF THE PROM

“If Forbidden Broadway and the John Hughes teen films that ruled the ’80s had a queer baby, it might look something like the frothy new musical comedy, The Prom. That means the show is one part satire, packed with delicious theatrical in-jokes delivered with aplomb by game stage veterans playing caricatures of…”

WALL STREET JOURNAL REVIEW OF THE PROM

“In the wake of the midterm elections, the pollsters are telling us that America is growing even more politically polarized, and that we’re less willing than ever before to listen to those with whom we disagree. If that’s so, what effect will this heightened polarization have on the world of theater, a one-party state…”

 

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